La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids des

Communiqués et nouvelles touchant les aéroports au Québec, au Canada, des changements aux procédures ou aux espaces aériens, ou toute information qui est digne de mention pour les pilotes du Québec.

La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids des

Messagepar VMF-214 » Lun 15 Oct, 2018 13:58

LSA de 1,320 lb à 3,600 lb.

EAA: 3600-Pound LSA Just A Starting Point.
BY PAUL BERTORELLI
p1cpdbivm51asj17gh1eeovj01mm66 (1).jpg
LSA de 1,320 lb à 3,600 lb.
p1cpdbivm51asj17gh1eeovj01mm66 (1).jpg (14.42 Kio) Vu 819 fois


The FAA’s just-revealed report that it would consider raising the light sport aircraft limit from 1320 pounds to 3600 pounds is just a proposed talking point and any rule is at least a year and a half away, according to EAA. And no, the 3600-pound figure isn’t a typo nor confusion over kilogram conversion, as some have speculated.

In this exclusive AVweb podcast, Sean Elliott, EAA’s VP for advocacy and safety, says the 3600-pound number is real enough, but it’s just one idea placed before the FAA as part of a broader program called Modernization of Special Airworthiness Certificates or MOSAIC. That project, which encompasses a broad range of potential changes in the experimental, light sport, certified and UAS segments, has been underway for about two years. Elliott says it’s unlikely to yield any specific Notices of Proposed Rule Making until at least 2020, if not beyond. EAA said on Wednesday that chairman Jack Pelton erred over the weekend when he said the NPRM would appear in January when in fact the rulemaking process will start then.

“What comes out as far as weight is yet to be seen. There’s a lot of work yet to be done to get to that final point. But essentially, it’s a good news story. The FAA and the industry together are achieving meaningful change,” Elliott said.

News stories over the weekend ignited hopeful speculation, but also confusion as amateur regulatory sleuths tried to imagine how a 3600-pound airplane could be limited to two seats. But Elliott says proposed changes won’t necessarily keep the light sport aircraft rule just as it is now.

“It’s going to be reasonable. I think you’ll certainly see an increase in the number of seats, although we don’t know that for sure. What’s comes out of the other end of the rulemaking process will certainly give us those indications,” Elliott said. Raising the seat count, the speed and removing other limitations would pave the way for grandfathering legacy aircraft and that’s definitely on the table, Elliott said.

The underlying thinking is that the industry has convinced the FAA that risk ought to be seen as a continuum, with for-hire and scheduled airlines at one end and personal flying in light aircraft at the other, with regulatory and certification limitations adjusted accordingly. “It’s what makes sense for these kinds of aircraft,” Elliott said. “What the final number or a final set of performance values or metrics, remains to be seen.”

Serving the training market is a major animator for both the FAA and the GA industry. “A big part of this for EAA is to help find pathways forward for new aircraft that can fill those voids in the Mom and Pop flight training organizations. Right now, you see most of these organizations operating 40- and 50-year-old-airframes. And it shows. For the unwashed citizen who shows up at a flight school excited about getting involved with aviation, for some, it’s a very quick turnoff,” Elliott said.

Less expensive ASTM consensus approval standards in lieu of Part 23 certification might stimulate new entries. But will legacy manufacturers go along? The test of that has been EAA’s STC program to push non-TSO’d avionics into certified aircraft. “Initially, there was a fair amount of negativity about it, about how this was going to be damaging and they put all their energy in their own products. And that very quickly morphed into the manufacturers saying, ‘We can do this too,’” Elliott said.


LSA Weight Increase: Pop The Champagne Cork?
BY PAUL BERTORELLI

Is the FAA about to go all-in and all but remove the weight restriction on light sport aircraft? Here, key the ecclesiastical music, insert the visual of the clouds parting and Jack Pelton descending the mount with the stone tablets, or at least a USB drive announcing something intriguing.

But let’s tap the brakes and see what develops. We heard over the weekend that a proposal is coming from the FAA to raise the light sport weight limit to 3600 pounds. For a benchmark, that’s what a Cirrus SR22 weighs and also a Piper Saratoga. Yeah! Riding to the pancake breakfast in style at last.

In a moment of giddy enthusiasm, I’m mixing apples and oranges here. The light sport airplane rule and sport pilot privileges aren’t the same thing. But for argument’s sake, let’s say this proposal—and we have absolutely no confirmed detail on it yet—mashes together the airplane rule, the light sport pilot rule and BasicMed. Pour that out of the blender and you get 3600-pound single-engine piston airplanes that a pilot could fly with up to six occupants, with driver's license certification.

You could operate VFR or IFR within the U.S. at altitudes below 18,000 feet and not exceeding 250 knots. If this rule actually does that—and I’m speculating here just to entertain myself on a slow Sunday night—this could be, well, yyuuuuge. Or at least moderately stimulative, as BasicMed appears to have been. (Hard numbers are elusive.)

This idea is not a new one, by the way. It was circulating about four years ago as a kind of background proposal. Same 3600-pound gross weight, but the idea was that it would allow manufacturers to use ASTM consensus standards—same as LSA—to design, build and certify new models, rather than the more restrictive FAR Part 23, which requires extensive test programs. You don’t need to be a bean counter to understand how this would reduce the cost of bringing new airplanes into the market, although how much is impossible to say.

It could very well encourage new entrants who otherwise might take a powder because of low volume and daunting certification costs. Regardless of the real cost reduction, it would undeniably be a positive thing for general aviation, even if it reduces new model sticker prices by just a third. I wouldn’t expect too much more than that based on where Icon finally settled out with its prices: almost the equal of a new Cessna 172.

There’s a possible dark side, too. And you know what it is. The existing light sport industry could be impacted on several fronts. One, legacy airplanes would suddenly gain more utility and more value, making not-that-cheap LSAs somewhat less attractive. And if new ones aren’t selling, used ones won’t be as attractive, either. We’ve been expecting the light sport market to shake out significantly, but it hasn’t yet. Grandfathering more older airplanes into no-medical-required eligibility seems certain to have an erosive effect.

But what many people miss about this equation is that even though light sports are expensive, they’re still the cheapest new airplanes. By a lot. A new Flight Design CTLS retails for about $180,000, less than half the price of new Skyhawk. The CTLS is faster and burns less gas. Yeah, it carries only two people, but then abundant data show that most GA trips carry one or two people, not four. Still, lots of buyers like to carry around seats they never use.
But that’s a bad example. The better one is Vashon’s new Ranger, which I reviewed here. Nice airplane and one poised for the kind of efficient, automated production you don’t see in general aviation. But the Ranger is heavy and lacks enough useful load. I’m not thrilled with the O-200 engine, either. A higher weight limit could transform the airplane and if it were me, I’d slap an IO-240 into the airframe or maybe even a Rotax 915, which would make it a real hot rod and something more interesting than it already is.

We’re told that this proposal may surface sometime next year as an actual NPRM. Twixt cup and lip and all that. But even if nothing ever comes of it but this delusional blog, that’s something, right?
VMF-214
Nouveau membre
Nouveau membre
 
Messages: 29
Inscription: Sam 30 Juin, 2018 09:15
Possédez-vous une licence de pilote?: Oui
Marque de l'avion:
Modèle de l'avion:
Identification de l'avion:

Re: La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids

Messagepar Foxtrotpapa » Lun 15 Oct, 2018 16:28

J’ai hâte de voir la suite. C’est quand même majeure.
Francois
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Foxtrotpapa
Vrai participant
Vrai participant
 
Messages: 1077
Inscription: Mer 11 Juin, 2014 20:09
Localisation: Montérégie Ouest
Possédez-vous une licence de pilote?: Oui
Marque de l'avion: ICP
Modèle de l'avion: Savannah VG
Identification de l'avion:

Re: La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids

Messagepar bush pilot » Lun 15 Oct, 2018 16:33

pas si majeure que ça , c'est juste pour compense le poids moyen des américains

lol
Avatar de l’utilisateur
bush pilot
Vrai participant
Vrai participant
 
Messages: 1453
Inscription: Ven 04 Mar, 2011 21:18
Localisation: prevost
Possédez-vous une licence de pilote?: Non spécifié
Marque de l'avion: Pégazair
Modèle de l'avion: SP 100 -150 HP
Identification de l'avion:

Re: La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids

Messagepar Bob Cadi » Lun 15 Oct, 2018 18:31

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Bob
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Bob Cadi
Vénérable
Vénérable
 
Messages: 9107
Inscription: Ven 20 Fév, 2004 22:04
Localisation: Roxton Pond
Possédez-vous une licence de pilote?: Oui
Marque de l'avion: Bush-Caddy
Modèle de l'avion: L-160 @ 180 hp
Identification de l'avion: C-GPEF

Re: La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids

Messagepar Alain T » Jeu 08 Nov, 2018 15:01

bush pilot a écrit:pas si majeure que ça , c'est juste pour compense le poids moyen des américains

lol


Justement, c'est GROS!

:D
Alain T
Participant occasionnel
Participant occasionnel
 
Messages: 150
Inscription: Sam 02 Jan, 2016 17:22
Localisation: Stoneham, Qc
Possédez-vous une licence de pilote?: Non, mais j'en rêve
Marque de l'avion:
Modèle de l'avion:
Identification de l'avion:

Re: La FAA se propose d’augmenter la limite maximum de poids

Messagepar Birdman » Jeu 08 Nov, 2018 17:07

Etk, c'est un argument de poids. :danse1:

Birdman
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Birdman
Vrai participant
Vrai participant
 
Messages: 1241
Inscription: Mer 27 Juin, 2007 11:13
Localisation: Châteauguay
Possédez-vous une licence de pilote?: Oui
Marque de l'avion: Cessna
Modèle de l'avion: 172N
Identification de l'avion: C-GSXN


Retourner vers Nouvelles aéronautiques générales

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 1 invité